Archives for category: Fresno Pacific University

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAStudents taking my professional development courses often ask me how to evaluate and grade artwork that their students have made. Unlike other curricular areas such as math or history, art is a subject that doesn’t result in answers that can be marked “right” or “wrong”, so how should a teacher go about grading it? The answer — in my opinion — is easier than you might think.

When I’m evaluating student artwork, I focus mainly on two things: their effort and their involvement.

Where art is concerned, people tend to get caught up in what the finished piece (or outcome) “looks like”, rather than the quality of the process that got them there. Differences in art exposure and experience will produce vastly different outcomes between students, so that hardly seems an equitable approach to evaluation. For example, as a trained artist, how my final art piece compares to the work of someone who has never held a paint brush doesn’t make sense. But EVERYONE can demonstrate a high level of effort and involvement when creating art, and I believe this is the key.

Rather than “getting the right answer” — in the form of a finished piece that looks a certain way — I believe that authentic art experiences should encourage exploration of subject matter and materials. Sometimes this exploration results in an end product that is expected and satisfying to the maker and the viewer… sometimes not. But both should be valued as creative growth and as successful.

With older students in particular, I often list requirements or expectations for a given art experience. This lets the students know in very specific terms what techniques and/or materials I expect them to use during their work. When such a list is part of the assignment, then naturally the use — or omission — of them becomes part of my evaluation process. If a required element is not explored or included, that counts “against” the grade. This circles back to my original premise of evaluating effort and involvement, because if a student hasn’t attempted the requirements, they clearly haven’t demonstrated their full effort, nor have they been fully involved in the assignment.

An example came up this week with a professional development student of mine submitting photos and an evaluation to me of an art lesson she taught to her own students. Of one student’s work she remarked, “His piece ended up just looking like a lot of black on the paper, rather than distinct lines.” Nevertheless, she included that piece in the display, and I applauded her for that. What I said back to her was that for that particular student, his process of drawing the lines — though he did it over and over again until his work was a mass of black — was a more important exploration and experience, than of having a final piece that looked a certain way. Did he demonstrate effort in the creation of his piece? Yes! He took the process of drawing lines so far that they became indistinguishable from one another. Was this student involved in the process? Absolutely! And do I love his teacher for not getting “hung up” on what his final piece looked like, and for accepting his creative effort and involvement for what it was? You better believe it!

If you have questions or thoughts about this topic, please share them in the comments section. If you’re looking for some fun, affordable, and convenient professional development credits, click here to find out more about the distance learning art classes I teach. (No previous art experience is necessary — but your full effort and involvement will be!) Thanks for reading.  😉

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IMG_2684Congratulations to Juliet Z. from Ohio! Juliet is the lucky winner of the last Art Kit I’m giving away as part of a year long promotion. She received her automatic entry into this giveaway by registering for my class ART 900: Drawing Magic.  You can read more about all of the Professional Development classes I offer here.

Juliet will be receiving not only her Art Kit stuffed with fun art goodies, but also a lesson plan developed specifically to use with them. Click here to see the full Art Kit contents. It’s been a fun year giving away these kits… thanks to everyone who played along.  🙂

Though the kits are gone… I’d still love to have YOU register for one of my Professional Development art classes. (No art experience required!) Each of my 5 classes is affordable, convenient, and self-paced. Imagine earning 3 units of graduate credit per class from the comfort of your own home, with full access to me via email. Your course materials will be delivered to you electronically within 48 hours of your registration, so you can begin immediately if you’d like to. What are you waiting for? (You know it sounds like fun!) Hope to see you soon!

IMG_2617Hello March! Even if the weather doesn’t quite feel like spring yet where you live, you know it’s just around the corner. And for teachers… that can only mean one thing: Spring Break! And just beyond that: Summer!

Why not take a moment now to plan some fun professional development experiences for yourself to begin over spring break, or to look forward to over the summer? What?! You don’t think of earning professional development credits as something you might “look forward” to? Well click here and prepare to think about professional development in a whole new way!

Each of the five distance-learning art courses I teach through Fresno Pacific University is affordable, convenient, self-paced and — best of all — fun! No previous art experience is required, but if you have some, I promise there’s something in these courses for you, too. You’ll also love the fact that no special, “exotic” art materials are required. But don’t just take my word for it, check out the student reviews for each course. (Click here for a list of all of my classes. Once there, click on the title of any class to read its description, download the syllabus, and/or read student reviews.)

Registration is easy, and if you enter promo code W11402JGF, you will save $10 off per course. Once I’ve been notified by the University of your registration, I’ll send you a “Welcome” email with your course book attached within 48 hours. It’s that simple! (And don’t forget FUN!) You can email me any time with questions, so it’s like I’m right there with you, cheering you on. Your personal art coach! 🙂 And really, with course names like, “Drawing Magic” and “The Magic of Paper“… what’s not to enjoy?!

Together we can make your vacation time fun and productive! I look forward to “seeing” you in class soon.

IMG_2599Here’s a quick little art experience you might like to try with your students that will help them explore the differences between positive and negative shapes and space.

All you need are 3 sheets of white paper per student — even copy paper will do — some small pieces of scratch paper, pencils, and cotton balls or tissue.

To begin, ask your students to cut a shape out of their first sheet of paper. Depending on the age and ability levels of your students, the shapes can range from simple, free-form organic shapes, to something much more complex. You will want to have them cut out their shape so that when they are finished, they are left with two things: the shape itself that they cut out, and the outside edge of paper around what they cut out.

Have them place the paper that they have left over from cutting out their shape, on top of their second piece of paper. (You might want to have them tape the top and bottom pieces of paper together to prevent movement.) Using a pencil, have them rub a patch of lead onto a piece of scratch paper. Using a cotton ball or a tissue, have them pick up some of that pencil lead and begin to rub it from the outside edge of the paper toward the center open space left by the shape they cut out.

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Continue this process of rubbing pencil lead from the outside edge in toward the center, until they have filled the center with pencil shading. Carefully separate the two sheets of paper. What they are left with is a shaded image of their shape. This shaded shape is the “positive” image. If you were to peek under an edge while they worked, it would look like this:

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Next, ask your students to carefully position the actual shape they cut out on top of their third sheet of paper. (You might consider having your students place one or two tape loops underneath their shape to keep it from moving around.) Using the same pencil lead and cotton ball or tissue, this time you are going to ask your students to rub from the shape itself onto the paper below.

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Have them continue rubbing from their shape onto the paper underneath it until they have rubbed all the way around. Ask them to carefully separate the two pieces of paper, set their actual cut out shape aside, and what they will be left with is an image of their shape determined by the shading around the outside of it. This is the “negative” image of their shape. If you were to peek underneath their shape while they were working, it would look like this:

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Try this yourself first so you can see how easy and fun it is to do. Kids are always delighted by this experience because the results seem so magical!

Looking for more art lessons like this one to incorporate into your classroom curriculum? Check out my affordable, convenient, and self-paced Professional Development course offerings through Fresno Pacific University here. This particular lesson is part of my class called Drawing Magic.

IMG_2557Hello February 2014!

I’d like to celebrate this month by “sharing the love” with an art book giveaway! (Who doesn’t LOVE something FREE?!) Simply leave a comment on this blog post, and you will be automatically entered to win one of two brand new copies of the book pictured above entitled, “M.C. Escher The Graphic Work”.

This book would make a terrific addition to any art library. Your students will be intrigued not only by Escher’s incredible imagination, but also by his impressive skill. Here are just a few images you will find in this wonderfully illustrated book.

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IMG_2558Comment on this post anytime between now and Friday, February 7, 2014 by 6 p.m. Pacific Standard Time, and you could win! I have two copies to give away, so two winners will be selected at random from the entries. (Winners will be notified by email so that I may obtain mailing addresses. Of course, I will cover the cost of mailing. It is, after all, a FREE giveaway, so winning will cost you nothing!)

And while you’re here… consider for just a moment whether or not you need any professional development credits. Or maybe you’d like some easy-to-implement art lesson ideas for your classroom? If either of these sound like you, please click here to see the affordable, convenient and self-paced professional development art classes I teach through Fresno Pacific University. (Absolutely no art experience is necessary or required!)

Thanks for stopping by, and good luck in the drawing for the books!

IMG_2439Hello 2014 and congratulations to my third Art Kit winner! Justin G. will be receiving his free art kit in the mail from me soon, and will enjoy all of the fabulous goodies you see pictured below. (The kit also includes a lesson plan designed to use the supplies in your kit.)

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I’ve only got one more kit like this to give away, so click here to find out how easy it is to be included in the drawing scheduled for April 1, 2014.

If you’re a teacher looking for affordable, convenient, self-paced professional development, click here to register for one of my user-friendly art classes offered through Fresno Pacific University, and you might just win an Art Kit! (As you can see from the tag, Justin signed up for my class ART 902: The Magic of Paper. (He also signed up for my class ART 900: Drawing Magic, but that registration didn’t win him the kit.)

So resolve to bring some EASY art lessons into your classroom this year — no muss, no fuss! Let me show you how fun and powerful art can be.

COVER-226x282.ashxI recently came across a terrific little article in the September 2013 issue of California Educator magazine. (Click here to view the digital edition of the magazine and read the article that starts on page 9.)

The article is entitled, “5 Reasons to Bring Back the Arts”, and it’s the magazine’s cover story. I urge you to take a look at this piece because it’s a nice summation — a very quick read, written in a sort of “bullet point” style — about why the arts are essential, and about what they bring to the educational table. Statements like “the arts help students express themselves”, and “the arts make you smarter”, are explored and backed up with studies. If you don’t already see the value of a thoughtfully planned and implemented art program, this short but persuasive article might just make a believer out of you.

If you’d like to start bringing meaningful art experiences into your classroom, but don’t know how to get started, click here for information about my affordable, convenient, and self-paced professional development courses that you work on from home on your own schedule.

IMG_2245Hello October! In addition to being excited about this new month which brings such lovely fall weather… I’m also very excited to announce my second Art Kit winner!

Congratulations to T. Leonard who earned her entries by registering for my distance learning class ART 900: Drawing Magic. (If you need affordable, convenient, self-paced professional development, check out the information here.)

Each Art Kit is loaded with terrific art supplies, and a lesson plan ready for use in your classroom or homeschool setting. Click here to learn more about this fabulous kit, and to find out how easy it is to be entered into the drawings to win one.

I hope your month is off to a great start! I know T. Leonard’s is… she can look forward to receiving her Art Kit full of goodies very soon!

IMG_2090Now that the 4th of July holiday is behind us, it feels like summer is really in full swing. If you’re a teacher, and I suspect many of you reading this are, how are your plans going so far? Did you tell yourself that this would be the summer break for some professional development, but you still haven’t done anything about it yet?

Have I got some great news for you!

My distance learning, professional development art classes are affordable, convenient and self-paced. And you can register any time — like right now! Here! — and work like crazy to finish within the 3 week minimum, or take up to one full, leisurely year to complete your work. Visit my page on Fresno Pacific University’s site to read all about the art classes I offer, and to see what your fellow teachers have had to say about them — and me!

Drawing Magic

Bulletin Boards and Room Environments

The Magic of Paper

Building Self Esteem Through Elementary Art

Ideas To Draw From

No art experience is necessary — or required — for any of my classes, so picture yourself having fun, making art in your pjs or your swimsuit, all while earning some professional development credits from the comfort of your own home. (Sounds good, doesn’t it?!) Since every experience in every class I teach is immediately ready for use in your classroom, you’ll also be armed with some outstanding lessons to share with your students come fall.

If all that isn’t enticing enough, right now, each course of mine that you register for will earn you SIX entries into an “Art Kit” giveaway I’m running this year. This kit is valued at more than $100, plus includes a lesson plan that uses all of the supplies in your kit. You can read all about it here.

I hope to see you in class soon!

IMG_1763Congratulations to Ann G. of Sterling Heights, MI!

Ann is the winner of the first of four fabulous Art Kits I’m giving away over the course of a year. Her registration in my class ART 902: The Magic of Paper in April provided her with the winning entry “ticket”.

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Click here to read more about the art kit, and about how YOU can be entered to win the kit pictured at the top of this post. The next winner will be drawn on October 1, 2013. Hint: One way to be entered into this drawing is to take one or more of my art classes offered through Fresno Pacific University’s Center for Professional Development, just like Ann did. So… if you’re still thinking about earning some professional development credits this summer, it’s not too late, and you can register here. My classes are affordable, convenient, and self-paced. (No art experience required or necessary.)

Hope to see you in class this summer!