Archives for category: Art Education

IMG_2245Hello October! In addition to being excited about this new month which brings such lovely fall weather… I’m also very excited to announce my second Art Kit winner!

Congratulations to T. Leonard who earned her entries by registering for my distance learning class ART 900: Drawing Magic. (If you need affordable, convenient, self-paced professional development, check out the information here.)

Each Art Kit is loaded with terrific art supplies, and a lesson plan ready for use in your classroom or homeschool setting. Click here to learn more about this fabulous kit, and to find out how easy it is to be entered into the drawings to win one.

I hope your month is off to a great start! I know T. Leonard’s is… she can look forward to receiving her Art Kit full of goodies very soon!

Advertisements

IMG_1778It’s back to school time once again, and with it comes all the mixed feelings of sadness that summer is winding down, and of excitement and anticipation for all the promise a new school year holds.

I was pleasantly surprised to find that the website We Are Teachers was promoting some printable teacher quotes today on Facebook, and that one of them was something I said. (Pulled from this very blog!) Click here for a link to this printable quote called “Take Another Look”, which I hope will inspire you to include more art in your classroom this year. Research shows that children involved in the arts benefit from it in innumerable ways. But most importantly, it’s fun… and your students will love you for it!

Best wishes for a successful and art-filled school year!

IMG_2090Now that the 4th of July holiday is behind us, it feels like summer is really in full swing. If you’re a teacher, and I suspect many of you reading this are, how are your plans going so far? Did you tell yourself that this would be the summer break for some professional development, but you still haven’t done anything about it yet?

Have I got some great news for you!

My distance learning, professional development art classes are affordable, convenient and self-paced. And you can register any time — like right now! Here! — and work like crazy to finish within the 3 week minimum, or take up to one full, leisurely year to complete your work. Visit my page on Fresno Pacific University’s site to read all about the art classes I offer, and to see what your fellow teachers have had to say about them — and me!

Drawing Magic

Bulletin Boards and Room Environments

The Magic of Paper

Building Self Esteem Through Elementary Art

Ideas To Draw From

No art experience is necessary — or required — for any of my classes, so picture yourself having fun, making art in your pjs or your swimsuit, all while earning some professional development credits from the comfort of your own home. (Sounds good, doesn’t it?!) Since every experience in every class I teach is immediately ready for use in your classroom, you’ll also be armed with some outstanding lessons to share with your students come fall.

If all that isn’t enticing enough, right now, each course of mine that you register for will earn you SIX entries into an “Art Kit” giveaway I’m running this year. This kit is valued at more than $100, plus includes a lesson plan that uses all of the supplies in your kit. You can read all about it here.

I hope to see you in class soon!

IMG_1763Congratulations to Ann G. of Sterling Heights, MI!

Ann is the winner of the first of four fabulous Art Kits I’m giving away over the course of a year. Her registration in my class ART 902: The Magic of Paper in April provided her with the winning entry “ticket”.

IMG_2016

Click here to read more about the art kit, and about how YOU can be entered to win the kit pictured at the top of this post. The next winner will be drawn on October 1, 2013. Hint: One way to be entered into this drawing is to take one or more of my art classes offered through Fresno Pacific University’s Center for Professional Development, just like Ann did. So… if you’re still thinking about earning some professional development credits this summer, it’s not too late, and you can register here. My classes are affordable, convenient, and self-paced. (No art experience required or necessary.)

Hope to see you in class this summer!

IMG_1996I’m thinking a lot today about the most important mentor I’ve had for my art and teaching careers. That mentor was my Dad, Ralph Gomas. Today he would have been 78 years old, so of course I’m thinking of him even more than usual on his birthday.

Without his example — his and my mom’s actually, because she’s very creative in her own right  — I don’t think I would have been interested in pursuing art as a career. In fact art and design were such an integral part of my life growing up, I didn’t really even consider them career options at first… they were so foundational. Because of this strong artistic foundation, becoming a graphic designer was a natural fit for me and I loved it. I was already working in the industry when we began to move away from using darkrooms, typesetters, and waxers, to working completely on the computer. It was liberating and frustrating all at once. (I still miss wielding an x-acto knife from time to time.)

Then life changed and I went back to school to earn my teaching credential. It took me by surprise how much I loved being in the classroom. It really is a performance of sorts, and I’d always loved doing that, so I shouldn’t have been shocked. My Dad’s help as I took the helm of a first grade classroom, and then years later, a continuation high school art room, was invaluable. (I literally don’t think I could have survived the start of that high school teaching assignment without his constant help and advice!) Next, I earned my Master’s Degree which enabled me to begin working side-by-side with my Dad teaching the Professional Development art courses he’d written for Fresno Pacific University’s Center for Professional Development. We spent hours together with him talking me through his thought process while reviewing the work of countless students from all over the country, and the world. This was mentoring at it’s best. Then we worked together in the same room but on separate computers reviewing student work. It was reassuring to know I could ask his opinion any time I needed to if I had a question about something a student had submitted.

Though he’s been gone for a little more than eight years now, his skilled mentoring still guides me to this day. He’s not sitting at the computer next to me, but I feel he’s always close in my heart when I really need him.

Have you had a special mentor while following your career path? Do they know how much they’ve helped and influenced you? Perhaps you yourself have had the privilege of being a mentor to someone. It can be an awesome responsibility as well as a terrific way to “pay it forward”.

IMG_1963In less than one month — on July 1st, 2013 — I will draw a name from this box to find out who gets the first of four fabulous art kits that I’m giving away over the course of a year. Is your name already in here? Will YOU be the lucky winner? Click here to read more about this terrific giveaway valued at more than $100, and learn how easy it is to be entered to win.

Hint: Registering for one of my Professional Development art courses offered through Fresno Pacific University will get your name entered into this drawing 6 times! Summer is a great time to earn some affordable PD credits from the comfort of your own home. Learn more here.

IMG_1809With graduation season upon us, and another school year drawing to a close, this is a great time to help students think about where they’ve been, where they are, and where they’re headed. The “My Life” pop-up book is a small, three-section book that invites students to think about significant events/people/places from their past and present, and to imagine their future. Breaking the book down into these three main time-frames will enable your students to more easily focus on significant details without being overwhelmed.

Here’s what you’ll need: Sheets of 9×12 inch construction paper in a variety of colors, construction paper scraps, scissors, tape, staples, glue, and markers. You might also want to include other materials such as brads, cotton, yarn, buttons, ribbon, string, fabric scraps, hole punches, and construction paper sheets larger than 9×12.

Each child will ultimately need 6 sheets of construction paper — 1 sheet for each of the three pop-up sections, and 1 “backing sheet” for each section. Because this book will consist of 3 separate sections, students may begin on any section they choose — past, present, or future. After all sections are complete, the book may be assembled in the correct order.

Begin by demonstrating how to make a simple pop-up tab. Fold one sheet of 9×12 inch construction paper in half, and make two parallel cuts along the folded edge for each pop-up tab you want to have, like this:

IMG_1790

After cutting, open your paper, and push the tabs you just cut to the “inside” of your folded paper. Close the folded paper with your tabs inside. When you open the folded paper back up, your tabs should stand up like this:

IMG_1791

Elements that will pop-up when the book is opened will be attached to the front of these “tabs”. Encourage your students to get fully involved in the surface decoration of each section of their book using construction paper scraps and any other materials that you have provided. For example, if their own birth is the significant event from their past that they want to represent, perhaps they will have a small crib as one pop-up element, with another being a large cut-out of the numbers for the year they were born. The “background” of the scene could be decorated like a wall in the baby’s room, and the “foreground” area decorated like the “floor” of that room. In other words, encourage the creation of entire settings or scenes to fully represent their significant event/place/person, etc.

IMG_1797

Depending on the age and ability levels of your students, a bit of writing for each section can be included to add depth and description to what they’ve created visually.

After a section is complete, a second sheet of construction paper should be folded in half and attached to the back of the section sheet like this:

IMG_1802

Once all three sections — and their backing sheets — are finished, the sections can be connected together using staples, double-sided tape, or glue. (Hint: you’ll need to be very patient if you use glue!) If you desire, you can have the students decorate the “cover” sheet of their book. For a more finished look, you can wrap a larger sheet of construction paper around the outside of all three sections of the book, and after attaching it, trim off any excess. (A 9×12 sheet won’t be large enough once you’ve connected all three sections of the book together.) This then can be decorated as the cover.

Not only will you learn a great deal about your students during this process, but they will love sharing the highlights of their lives with you and with their friends.

Interested in more fun art ideas like this one? Check out the affordable, self-paced, and convenient professional development art classes I teach through Fresno Pacific University here!

IMG_1763I’m so excited to introduce something brand new on my blog! I’m calling them “Art Kits”, and it’s super easy to be entered into a drawing to win one.

Each Art Kit is valued at over $100.00, and includes everything you see in the photo above, as well as an easy to follow, step-by-step lesson plan and 50 sheets of white drawing paper — And it can be YOURS for FREE!

I’ll be giving away a kit exactly like the one you see pictured above, every three months for the next year — that’s four kits in all! This is called Art Kit #1: Observational Drawing: Sea Shells. In addition to all of the fun stuff you see in the photo, you’ll also get a step-by-step lesson plan that you can use in your classroom immediately. (No art experience on your part is required or necessary.)

Students of all ages will love looking through their magnifying glasses to see a detailed view of any one of the interesting shells included. The lesson plan will walk you through an easy to present lesson that will encourage your students to carefully observe a shell and then create an original drawing of what they see. Soft lead pencils and special erasers will help them get their drawings “just right”. They will be thrilled to then add color with chalk using the ordinary blending tools of cotton balls and Q-tips! In addition to the excitement of creating art, you’ll see lots of valuable curriculum connection possibilities for your students in science, math, and language arts.

Here’s how to win!

1) Register for one or more of the affordable, convenient, self-paced Professional Development Art Classes that I teach through Fresno Pacific University here. Each registration will earn you 6 Entries into the Art Kit drawing.

2) Refer a colleague who registers for one or more of my courses and you’ll earn another 6 Entries into the Art Kit drawing. (I must be notified via email of the name of the person who made the referral in order for them to be given their 6 entries for that referral.)

3) Comments on my blog or Facebook page will each earn 1 entry into the Art Kit drawing. (Only one comment per person, per day will count towards entry into the drawing.)

Registrations, referrals, and comments will earn entry into the Art Kit drawings based on the following time table:

April-May-June: Winner’s name drawn on July 1, 2013

July-August-September: Winner’s name drawn on October 1, 2013

October-Nov-Dec: Winner’s name drawn on January 1, 2014

January-February-March: Winner’s name drawn on April 1, 2014

As you can see above, I’m breaking the year into quarters with April-May-June being the first block of time for the first Art Kit drawing. So for example, all course registrations received, colleagues referred & registered, and comments made from April 1, 2013 until June 30, 2013 will be included, and I will draw the winning name on July 1, 2013. Then the process begins again for July-August-September and so on, until the fourth and final Art Kit winner is drawn on April 1, 2014.

So what are you waiting for? Head on over to Fresno Pacific University and register for one of my art classes! Then get a friend or colleague to do the same! While you’re on a roll, comment on any of my blog posts or head on over to my Facebook page and get typing! You can’t win one of these great kits if you don’t enter… so get going and get excited!

(If you’d like to purchase Art Kit #1: Observational Drawing: Sea Shells, please contact me via email for information at JGomasFaison@gmail.com)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERALooking for a unique and creative way to celebrate Earth Day with your students this year? Allow me to suggest Earth Day hats! (Pictured above is a basic, undecorated scored paper hat shown from the side/back.)

The idea here is to have each student in your class create a hat, and then decorate it using Earth Day as the theme. While the basic hat shapes will be the same, each child’s surface decoration will be distinct and unique, making each hat a personal statement about how that child feels about protecting and celebrating the earth.

You will need one sheet of 18X24 inch construction paper for each child in your class — color choice is up to you. You will also need a stapler, any type of glue, scissors, and lots and lots of discard materials for the students to choose from. This could be anything from a scrap paper box, to things like, ribbon, buttons, cotton balls, tooth picks, fabric, feathers, tissue paper, brads, yarn, pipe cleaners, glitter, etc. This art experience is the perfect time to use up a variety of random things you have on hand, and to recycle old things into something fresh, fun, and new!

To make a basic hat, just make one simple scored line in a half circle shape on the long side of a sheet of 18X24 inch construction paper. (See diagram below.) If you’ve never scored paper before, you will simply drag the pointy end of a pair of scissors — or even the tip of a paper clip that’s been bent open will do — gently across the paper. This “scored” line that you’ve just created will allow you to then fold the paper along this curved line. (Scoring as a technique is amazing! Once you start exploring it, you’ll be hooked!) Attach points A and B together with a staple, and you’re done. Super simple! (In the photo at the top of this post, you can see this stapled connection point at the back of the hat.) If you’re working with very young students, it might be a good idea to have the hats made ahead of time for them so that they are all ready to be decorated. Scoring takes a little bit of practice so as not to cut through the paper while you’re doing it, but after a few tries, you will learn what amount of pressure is just right.

IMG_1738

If Earth Day is going to be your theme for hat decoration, it might be a good idea to spend some time talking with your students about all of the different ways they could decorate their hats to show how they feel about protecting and celebrating the earth. They could cut out letters to include words on their hats, they could cut out, or tear out, and create symbols to place on their hats (think earth, sun, clouds, water, plants), they could add fun, three dimensional things to their hats such as paper streamers, ribbons, and more. (I would strongly suggest that you not use drawing materials such as markers, crayons, or pencils for hat decoration, as drawings tend to lack the excitement and involvement that other types of surface decoration provide.) Perhaps this brainstorming could be captured as a list that the students could refer back to while they work?

By this time, your students will be highly motivated to get started creating their hat masterpieces, so there is little left to do beyond getting their hats and materials distributed to them. They will have a blast making something that is such a personal statement, and the fact that they will be able to wear them when they’re complete just sweetens the deal. (I’m envisioning a photo op in here somewhere!) Have fun with this, and I’d love to hear how it goes if you decide to try it! (Pictured below is a basic, undecorated scored paper hat from the front.)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

IMG_0521Spring Break! That glorious time is upon us. As you look forward to spending some much deserved time relaxing and recharging… I have a suggestion for you.

What about getting a jump start on some Professional Development during your break?

Each one of my 3 unit Professional Development art classes is affordable, convenient, and self-paced. You can register any time — day or night — and within 48 hours you will have your materials. This means you can get started right away on some really fun art lessons that you’ll be able to work on at your leisure, whenever you feel like it. The lessons that make up each class are immediately teachable in your own classroom, so you’ll return to school after break with some fantastic art lessons that will be easy to integrate into the curriculum you’re already planning to teach.

Click here for details, syllabi, or to register. I can’t wait to “see” you in class!